About Your Union

Here you will find some information about the unions which represent rail workers.  Annual financial reports filed with the US Department of Labor are available for each union and their various subordinate bodies (this includes your General Committee or local/division/federation). 

You can search for the financial reports by CLICKING HERE.


UTU - Transportation Division of Sheet Metal Air, Railroad and Transportation Union (SMART former SMWIA) website  - 

2011 Financial Report (LM-2) to Dept. of Labor

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: 

The United Transportation Union (UTU) is headquartered in Cleveland, Ohio. It is a broad-based, transportation labor union representing about 125,000 active and retired railroad, bus, mass transit, and airline workers in the United States.

The UTU is the largest railroad operating union in North America, with more than 600 locals. The UTU represents employees on every Class I railroad, as well as employees on many regional and shortline railroads. It also represents bus and mass transit employees on approximately 45 bus and transit systems and has grown to include airline pilots, flight attendants, dispatchers and other airport personnel. The UTU is very interested in the airline sector and hopes to expand its representation with pilots and flight attendants. The UTU believes it is a viable alternative to other aviation labor unions because the UTU is, and has been, proficient in interpreting and enforcing provisions of the Railroad Labor Act (RLA), under which airlines operate.

Membership is drawn primarily from the operating crafts in the railroad industry and includes conductors, brakemen, switchmen, ground service personnel, locomotive engineers, hostlers and workers in associated crafts. More than 1,800 railroad yardmasters also are represented by the UTU. The UTU's 8,000 bus and transit members include drivers, mechanics and employees in related occupations.


BMWED-  Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees - Division of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters - website

2012 Financial Report (LM-2) to Dept. of Labor

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

he Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employes (BMWE) - later to become the Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employes Division of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters (BMWED) - is a national union representing the workers who build and maintain the tracks, bridges, buildings and other structures on the railroads of the United States

Founded in 1887, at Demopolis, Alabama, as a fraternal organization by track foreman John T. Wilson, the BMWED membership forms a cross section of American culture. Their goals, interests and political backgrounds are as diversified as their heritage. Once an international union with over 350,000 members in the United States and Canada, automation, the rise of the trucking and airline industries, coupled with conservative government policies, has depleted the ranks of the BMWED to under 40,000 members. It was in 2004 that the BMWE merged with the International Brotherhood of Teamsters and consolidated its strength with that of the powerful 1.4 million member Teamster Union.


BLET-  Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers & Trainmen - Member of the Rail Conference of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters - website

2011 Financial Report (LM-2) to Department of Labor

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

The Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen (BLET) is a labor union founded in Marshall, Michigan, on May 8, 1863, as the Brotherhood of the Footboard. A year later, its name was changed to the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, sometimes referred to as the Brotherhood of Engineers.[1] In 2004, the BLE became the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen (BLET), a division of the Rail Conference of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters


BRC - Brotherhood of Railway Carmen -Website

The Brotherhood Railway Carmen Division of TCU was founded at Cedar Rapids, Iowa on October 27, 1888. The first By-Laws were adopted at Joint Convention in Topeka, Kansas, September 1890. Our union has merged with other railway unions four times, the most recent being August 6, 1986. In July 1987, Convention action re-named the union Transportation Communications International Union (TCU) effective October 1, 1987. The Brotherhood Railway Carmen is a division of the TCU.


IAM - International Association of Machinists  -  Website

from Wikipedia,the free encyclopedia:

The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers is an AFL-CIO/CLC trade union representing approx. 646,933 workers as of 2006 in more than 200 industries. The IAM was formed in 1888 by 19 machinists meeting in a locomotive pit in Atlanta, Georgia calling themselves "The Order of United Machinist and Mechanical Engineers." The organization remained secret for several years due to employer hostility toward organized labor. Despite the secrecy, the membership continued to grow thanks to "boomers", men who traveled from place to place looking for work on the railroads. Within a year 40 locals were established. At that point machinists made 20 to 25 cents an hour for a ten hour day. In 1889 the first Machinist Union convention was held with 34 locals represented, in the chambers of the Georgia State Senate. Tom Talbot was elected "Grand Master Machinist" and the IAM monthly journal was started. Also, at the convention the union's name was changed to "National Association of Machinists." The next year, 1890, the first Canadian local, Local Lodge 103, was chartered in Stratford, Ontario as well as locals in Mexico. Since The NAM had spread all over North America the union once again changed their name, this time to "The International Association of Machinists." The national headquarters was then moved to Richmond, Virginia.


BRS-  Brotherhood of Railway Signalmen  -  Website

2012 Financial Report (LM-2) to Department of Labor

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

The Brotherhood of Railroad Signalmen ([BRS) is a labor union in the United States and Canada. It represents workers who install and maintain signal systems on rail transport networks. Founded in 1901, it has a membership of approximately 9,500, including most of the signal employees on both the freight railroads and the passenger and commuter railroads.


TCU- Transportation Communications International Union an affiliate of the International Association of Machinists (IAM) - Website

2012 Financial Report from Department of Labor

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The union was founded in 1899 by 33 railroad clerks meeting in Sedalia, Missouri, who formed an organization named the "Order of Railroad Clerks of America". The organization renamed itself the "Brotherhood of Railway Clerks", in line with other railway "brotherhoods" of the time. In 1919, it renamed itself the "Brotherhood of Railway and Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express and Station Employes" to reflect its broadened jurisdiction. In 1967, it changed names again to the "Brotherhood of Railway, Airline, Steamship Clerks, Freight Handlers, Express and Station Employes", commonly known as BRAC. Finally, in 1987, after absorbing members from a half dozen other unions that merged with BRAC, the organization adopted its current name. 

The Order of Railroad Telegraphers was founded in June 1886 at Cedar Rapids, Iowa. In 1965, the ORT changed its name to the Transportation Communications Employees Union. It merged with BRAC in 1969.

The Railway Patrolmen's International Union represented rail police officers on a number of railroads. RPIU merged with BRAC in 1969 and is now incorporated in its Allied Services Division.

The United Transport Services Employees Union was founded in 1937 as the International Brotherhood of Red Caps, representing baggage handlers at railroad stations. A largely African-American union, it was founded with the support of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters. It changed its name to UTSE in 1940 and joined the Congress of Industrial Organizations in 1942. The Red Cap and Sky Cap members of UTSE merged with BRAC in 1972 and are also part of its Allied Services Division.

The Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters became a part of BRAC in 1978. Founded in 1925 by A. Philip Randolph, the Porters organized for twelve years—largely in secret and in the hostile racial climate of those years—before winning a collective bargaining agreement with the anti-union Pullman Company. BSCP members, including Edgar Nixon, played a significant role in the U.S. civil rights movement in the decades that followed. When the Porters merged with BRAC, they formed the Sleeping Car Porters System Division. Today, these and other on-board Amtrak workers are represented by System Division 250.

The American Railway Supervisors Association, later renamed the American Railway and Airway Supervisors Association, was founded on November 14, 1934, by a group of supervisors on the Chicago and North Western Railway. ARASA merged with BRAC in 1980 and continues as a separate Supervisors' Division, operating under its own by-laws, within TCU.

The Western Railway Supervisors Association was founded by a group of Southern Pacific yardmasters who originally organized in 1938, then after joining and splitting from several other yardmasters unions, merged with BRAC in 1983. Its members now constitute System Board 555 and, like other groups within the union, operate under their own by-laws.

The Brotherhood of Railway Carmen was founded on September 9, 1890, in Topeka, Kansas, by railroad employees engaged in the repair and inspection of railroad cars. The Brotherhood merged with BRAC in 1986 and is now part of TCU's Carmen Division, which operates under its own by-laws with a vice-president who holds a seat on TCU's Executive Council.

In July 2005, TCU members voted to merge the union with the International Association of Machinists.


IBEW-  International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers  -  Website

2012 Financial Report (LM-2) from Department of Labor

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) is a labor union which represents workers in the electrical industry in the United States, Canada, Panama and several Caribbean island nations; particularly electricians, or Inside Wiremen, in the construction industry and linemen and other employees of public utilities. The union also represents some workers in the computer, telecommunications, broadcasting, and other fields related to electrical work. It was founded in 1891 shortly after homes and businesses in the United States began receiving electricity.


NCFO-  National Conference of Firemen & Oilers  -  Website

2011 Financial Report (LM-2) from Department of Labor

NCFO—now a district of SEIU Local 32BJ—represents working men and women in a wide variety ofoccupations and industries, including  building services, food processing, distilleries, manufacturing, federal parks and recreation areas, utilities, public services and both passenger and freight rail. They represent working people who keep schools warm and clean and others who provide warm meals to school children. There are NCFO members who make pumps, others who make sure water is pumped to your homes. There are members who ready the commuter train that takes you to work and others making sure there's fuel in the train that takes you—or goods that you need—across  the country. Some of the people we represent make parts for furnaces; others keep huge factories heated or connect a supply of natural gas to your home.   Some guard prisoners while others manufacture pillows and peanut butter.  Whether it’s producing ham for your dinner table or a candle to provide atmosphere, NCFO members are involved.  You’ll find NCFO there to defend the rights of workers providing direct care to patients in state mental hospitals—or, in another part of the country, giving patients the X-rays they need.  Whether it’s oiling door hinges in public housing, or huge machines used in distilling bourbon or manufacturing paper, NCFO is there.


Yardmasters - UTU  -  Website

The Railroad Yardmasters of America, organized Dec. 2, 1918, in response to managerial abuses. The RYA voted in 1985 to affiliate with the UTU.

Yardmaster.JPG

ATDA-  American Train Dispatchers Association Website

2012 Financial Report (LM-2) from Department of Labor

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

The American Train Dispatchers Association or Train Dispatchers is an American trade union representing railroad workers. The Train Dispatchers belong to the AFL-CIO as one of the organization's smallest members. ATDA operates mostly as a craft union representing railroad dispatchers. Specialized forms of dispatchers including trick train dispatchers, night chief dispatchers and assistant chief dispatchers are also members of the union. The organization also represents the crafts that provide power to electrified trains, mostly on commuter lines. The titles in this jurisdiction are power supervisors, power directors and load dispatchers. On short line railroads, the organization acts as more of an industrial union and also represents trainmen, enginemen, maintenance of way employees, mechanics and clerical staff.


SMWIA-  Sheet Metal Workers' International Association  -  Website

2011 Financial Report (LM-2) from Department of Labor

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia:

The Sheet Metal Workers International Association is a trade union of skilled metal workers who perform architectural sheet metal work, fabricate and install heating and air conditioning work, shipbuilding, appliance construction, heater and boiler construction, precision and specialty parts manufacture, and a variety of other jobs involving sheet metal. The Sheet Metal Workers International Association represents about 150,000 members in 185 local unions in the United States and Canada.

Note:  The merger of the SMWIA with the UTU is now known as SMART (Sheet Metal Air, Railroad and Transportation Union)


IBB- International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers and Helpers  -  Website

2012 Financial Report (LM-2) from Department of Labor

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: 

The International Brotherhood of Boilermakers, Iron Ship Builders, Blacksmiths, Forgers and Helpers is a trade union in the United States and Canada. It is for boilermakers and related occupations, and is affiliated with both the AFL-CIO and CLC.

The Boilermakers union has a three-year apprenticeship training program before becoming a Journeyman. Boilermakers primarily work in nuclear and fossil power plants. However they also work in shipyards, refineries and chemical plants. The work involves welding, rigging and fabricating. All work done is governed by OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) or MSHA (Mine Safety and Health Administration).

The US Railroad Division was formed in 1969 at the Boilermakers Twenty-Third Consolidated Convention in Kansas City, Missouri. The Division was formed to service solely those members employed in the Railroad industry in the United States.


ARASA-  American Railway and Airway Supervisors Association  -  Website

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: 

The American Railway Supervisors Association, later renamed the American Railway and Airway Supervisors Association, was founded on November 14, 1934, by a group of supervisors on the Chicago and North Western Railway. ARASA merged with BRAC in 1980 and continues as a separate Supervisors' Division, operating under its own by-laws, within TCU. The TCU is an affiliate of IAM.


TCRC- Teamsters Canada Rail Conference  -  Website

The Teamsters union represents 125,000 Canadians, over 16,000 of those members work in the rail industry and are represented by the Teamsters Canada Rail Conference.

CN Loco.jpg

UNIFOR -  Canadian Auto Workers Website

Unifor is Canada’s largest private sector union, with more than 305,000 members across the country, working in every major sector of the Canadian economy. Rail transportation is an important part of the UNIFOR'S membership. The rail members were previously members of the Canadian Auto Workers (CAW).


IBEW-  International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers - Canada Website

The International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) has been a proud part of the Canadian labour movement for over 100 years.  We have built our union on our commitment to organize and represent workers; our membership and longevity is proof of that commitment.

The IBEW represents workers in many different industries such as Manufacturing, Telecommunications, Voice Data Video, Utilities, Construction, Maintenance, Motor Shops, Sign Shops, CATV, Radio and Television, Sound and Alarm systems, Railroads, Shipyards, Pulp and Paper Mills, Mining, Tree Trimming, Health Care and Government employees. 


USW-  United Steel Workers - Canada Website

coal-trains-2.jpg